dijs 2019

Greg

Jim

Greg

“Thirty Frames A Second”Simple Minds

This week, it's Greg's turn to pop a quarter in the desert island jukebox and play a song he can't live without. After the Sharon Van Etten conversation, Greg has the Jupiter 4 synthesizer on the brain and picked one of his favorite songs that expertly uses the instrument. He chose "Thirty Frames A Second" by Simple Minds off their 1980 album Empires and Dance. While Simple Minds is best known for "Don't You (Forget About Me)," Greg prefers their earlier material. The band's usage of the Jupiter 4 on“Thirty Frames A Second”is eerie, inventive and danceable.

Go to episode 702

Jim

“Mother Russia”Renaissance

Most weeks, either Jim or Greg take a trip to the desert island and play a song they can't live without. This week, Jim selected "Mother Russia" by Renaissance, a classical-influenced British prog rock group. Jim thinks that the group doesn‘t get the respect it deserves. He goes on to add that he’s "surpised that bands like The Decemberists or Arcade Fire don't mention Renaissance more as one of the orchestral-pop rediscoveries" because he "hears a lot of the roots of what orc-pop has been doing in the last decade in what Renaissance was doing in 1974."

Go to episode 700

Greg

“The Seventh Seal”Scott Walker

This week, Greg is taking a trip to put a quarter in the desert island jukebox and play a song he can't live without! In March of 2019, the singer and songwriter Scott Walker died at age 76. Recently, Greg spoke with members of the experimental metal band Sunn 0))) who reflected on their unusual collaboration with Walker, who began his career doing blue-eyed soul and somehow towards the end did a song that mentioned both Elvis's twin and 9/11. Greg chose the song "The Seventh Seal" off Walker's 1969 album Scott 4. The song is a reference to the 1957 Ingmar Bergman film of the same name. It deals with a knight who gets in a chess match with Death and unfortunately doesn't come out on top.

Go to episode 699

Greg

Greg puts another quarter in the Desert Island Jukebox, this time paying tribute to Mark Hollis of the British rock band Talk Talk, who died last month at the age of 64. During his career, Mark evolved from a punk rocker into a composer of complex post-rock on albums such as Laughing Stock and Spirit of Eden, inspiring later bands like Radiohead. In between, Talk Talk scored a few synth-pop hits, like 1984's "It's My Life." Greg's selection, the aptly-titled "Life's What You Make It," is from an album that he think was a breakthrough in Hollis‘ career: 1986’s The Colour Of Spring.

Go to episode 692

Greg

“The Next Movement”The Roots

This week, it's Greg's turn to take a trip to the desert island jukebox and play a song he can't live without. He celebrates the 20th anniversary of The Roots' album Things Fall Apart by picking "The Next Movement." Greg notes that the late '90s/early 2000s were a golden era for hip hop, combining conscious rappers like Common and Black Thought with singers like Erykah Badu and D'Angelo. This blend is brilliantly on display throughout Things Fall Apart, and particularly on the track“The Next Movement.”Greg highlights lyrics that recognize the significance and rising popularity of black culture, and notes that every track on this record is solid as ever today.

Go to episode 689

Jim

“Space Truckin’”Deep Purple

Alan R. Pearlman

Jim pays tribute to the late Alan Robert Pearlman, inventor of the ARP synthesizer, who died in January at age 93. Before founding his synthesizer company in 1969, Pearlman worked for NASA designing amplifiers to be used on Gemini and Apollo spacecraft. In a nod to this aspect of his life, Jim plays "Space Truckin'" by Deep Purple in memory of Pearlman, a song Jim says is basically about“how cool it would be to be high in space.”The version on Deep Purple's 1972 live album, Made in Japan is almost 20 minutes long and features a wicked ARP solo by Jon Lord.

Go to episode 688

Greg

“Let’s Start The Dance”Hamilton Bohannon

This week, Greg takes us all on a trip to the desert island to put a quarter in the jukebox. He chose the track "Let's Start The Dance" by Hamilton Bohannon. Bohannon is a legendary drummer who provided the sound for many classic Motown songs by artists like Stevie Wonder and The Supremes. Greg wanted to ring in the new year by giving some love to Bohannon and hitting the dance floor!

Go to episode 685