dijs 2018

Greg

Jim

Jim_or_Greg

Paragraphs to follow - no need to pluralize names above, that will be done automatically as necessary
Go to episode 678

Jim

“The Have Nots”X

This week, Jim is taking the X track "The Have Nots" to the desert island jukebox. He decided to revisit the punk rock band X after a friend mentioned he recently saw them in concert again for the first time in many years. So Jim listened to the group during a long drive across the midwest, and was digging their album Under the Big Black Sun in particular. The song“The Have Nots”is a track about working class people just trying to get through the day, and sometimes we're all just trying to get through the day.

Go to episode 676

Greg

“Who Do You Love”Bo Diddley

Greg takes us back to the desert island with a selection by an artist that Jimmy Page recently cited as an inspiration for the founding of Led Zeppelin: pioneering rocker Bo Diddley. Bo Diddley introduced the hambone beat to rock, which later became known as the Bo Diddley beat - a rhythm with Afro-Carribean roots. His signature sound and swagger are clear on Greg's pick, "Who Do You Love." While Led Zeppelin's debut celebrated its 50th anniversary this year, Bo Diddley's self-titled debut album celebrates its 60th anniversary.

Go to episode 675

Jim

“These Days (feat. Trine Dyrholm)”Gatto Ciliegia Contro Il Grande Freddo

The interview with Susan Jacobs has Jim thinking of songs that have been used memorably in films for his addition to the Desert Island Jukebox. He first remembers hearing "These Days," a song Jackson Browne wrote for Nico, in The Royal Tennenbaums. Since then it's been used in many films, but none as affecting as Nico, 1988, says Jim. This biopic follows the singer in her final years, haunted by her early legacy with The Velvet Underground and performing in punk dives to earn enough to support her drug habit. The version of "These Days (feat. Trine Dyrholm)" the film's star, performs with Gatto Ciliegia Contro Il Grande Freddo is a beautiful rendition that matches or even betters the original.

Go to episode 673

Greg

“"High Water (For Charley Patton)"”Bob Dylan

Reflecting on the 17th anniversary of 9/11, Greg reminds us that two albums came out on September 11, 2001: Slayer's God Hates Us All and Bob Dylan's Love and Theft. He picks a track from the latter, High Water (For Charley Patton), about the cataclysmic Great Mississippi Flood in 1927. The flood displaced 630,000 people, many of whom were African American. It led to a huge surge in the Great Migration northward, only for the Depression to strike just two years afterwards. Greg says he's reminded of this song every September 11th, saying it captures the feeling of hopelessness felt by so many Americans during and after that day.

Go to episode 669

Jim

“Rustbelt”Voice of Addiction

For his latest Desert Island Jukebox pick, Jim makes a case for punk rockers Voice of Addiction. Formed in Chicago in 2004, Voice of Addiction centers political and social commentary in their high-energy music. The group came back on Jim's radar as the focus of a new feature-length documentary about the band, Punk Band. Jim selects their track Rustbelt off 2017's The Lost Art of Empathy as an essential blue-collar anthem.

Go to episode 667

Greg

“(Don't Worry) If There's a Hell Below, We're All Going to Go”Curtis Mayfield

Inspired by The Coup's keen social consciousness, Greg picks Curtis Mayfield's "(Don‘t Worry) If There’s a Hell Below, We're All Going to Go" for this week's desert island jukebox selection. He heard Durand Jones and the Indications cover this song at Lollapalooza earlier this month, the same weekend gun violence claimed 12 lives and wounded 62 others in Chicago. Though nearly 50 years old, Mayfield's song could not be more timely, critiquing the normalization of violence and the culture of complicity around it.

Go to episode 665

Jim

Glenn Branca passed away on May 13th at the age of 69. Jim's desert island jukebox pick highlights Glenn's contribution to the nascent noise, and no-wave scene in New York in the early 1980s, an exciting time when there were "no lines between what was going to blow up as hip-hop, what was going to blow up as graffiti art and experimental noise, but also [there were no lines between] pop music and rock and roll and the remnants of punk." Artists and break dancers alike were winding up in the same place. Against that backdrop, Glenn released The Ascension in 1981, which combined "avant-classical composition, multi-harmonics and dissonance" with a "lot of feedback". Jim remembers that watching the Glenn Branca Ensemble at CBGB was like "top of your head sheared off, brain spilling on the floor". For his pick, Jim chose Lesson # 2 from Glenn's album The Ascension, "which is really where [Glenn's career] begins".

Go to episode 661

Greg

“Silver Rocket”Sonic Youth

Greg is also heading to the Desert Island thing week with a track by a group inspired by Glenn Branca - Sonic Youth. He selected the track "Silver Rocket" from the group's 1988 album Daydream Nation.“Silver Rocket”channels the melding of chaotic guitars, dramatic volume changes and more than Branca pioneered and Sonic Youth perfected.

Go to episode 661

Greg

“I Don't Know Why I Love You”The House of Love

A band Greg highlighted earlier in the show, The Soft Science, released a cover of The House of Love's 1989 single "I Don't Know Why I Love You" as a B-side in April. For this spin on the Desert Island Jukebox, Greg's playing the original. He says that The House of Love was a victim of bad timing, coming after The Smiths, but before the Britpop boom. The song "I Don't Know Why I Love You" came on their second self-titled album. That session was their first for a major label and took more than two years and four producers to complete. Band members said new pressure to create hits caused tension within the band. The album's first single and some remixes were released against the band's will, adding to the trouble. Eventually guitarist Terry Bickers was kicked out of the band just a few days into the album's promotional tour. Still, Greg says the album is full of singles that hold up, even almost 30 years later. He points out similarities in the sound of Ride and The Stone Roses as evidence of The House of Love's influence.

Go to episode 659

Jim

“Ladies First”Queen Latifah,Monie Love,Queen Latifah

Jim dropped a coin in the Desert Island Jukebox this week and, inspired by Cardi B, selected "Ladies First" by Queen Latifah featuring Monie Love. Jim says that "female empowerment in hip hop starts with this phenomenal single," which was released in 1989. He loves the way "these women say we can do this, [and] we are not going to listen to anyone who says we can't." He notes that many people think of Queen Latifah primarily as an actress today, but“when she was on her game in hip hop, nobody was better.”

Go to episode 647

Greg

“Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)”The Temptations

Greg wants to pay tribute to the late Dennis Edwards, one of the lead singers of The Temptations, by putting a quarter into the desert island jukebox. Edwards died in early February at the age of 74. He was the lead singer during the band's second big era, where they delved into the genre of psychedelic soul and made some unforgettable contributions. Greg chose the song "Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)" because it's a great example of Edwards's vocal capabilities and he finds the theme of the track quite applicable to 2018.

Go to episode 638

Jim

“(Say No To) Saturday's Girl”Human Switchboard

The new year has inspired Jim's pick for this week's Desert Island Jukebox. Jim celebrated many a New Year's Eve at the bar Maxwell's in Hoboken. Recently, he was thinking about the December 31st evening he spent watching the group Human Switchboard perform. Human Switchboard was a band out of the Cleveland, Ohio scene that blended elements of rock, funk and punk to create their own unique sound. Once they moved to New York City in the '80s, they played clubs in and around the city back when people used to dance to New Wave music. Jim chose the track "(Say No To) Saturday's Girl" and it has him grooving in the new year.

Go to episode 632