Results for Alligator Records

interviews

Alligator Records' Bruce Iglauer

alligator

Alligator Records is a Chicago blues label that's been around for almost 50 years. While not necessarily a household name, Alligator Records has captured some of the most potent artists Chicago has offered since 1970, and has always championed a raw and unvarnished sound - not unlike punk in that way.

In 1970, 23-year-old Bruce Iglauer came to Chicago to work for the jazz and blues label Delmark Records, but quickly decided to stake out on his own. At a time when the blues was waning in popularity and prominence, Iglauer recognized that there was an audience of young rock fans who were interested in expanding their musical tastes. So, this young white guy assembles a roster of some of the most iconic artists of the genre, people like Albert Collins and Koko Taylor, and gets people excited about the music again. In his recent book Bitten By the Blues: The Alligator Records Story, Bruce Iglauer, along with co-writer Patrick A. Roberts, tells the story of the evolution of Alligator, its landmark artists and its importance in music history.

Go to episode 691
dijs

Greg

“Give Me Back My Wig”Hound Dog Taylor

The Gang of Four were heavily influenced by Chicago blues, and perhaps no label better represents that sound than Alligator Records. The label, run by blues fanatic Bruce Iglauer, is celebrating its 40th anniversary. To toast them, Greg adds one of his favorite tracks by Hound Dog Taylor to the Desert Island Jukebox. It's the stripped down, raw, mood-setting song "Give Me Back My Wig."

Go to episode 274
news

Music News

It may have been many years since you last thought about The Lemonheads, but they are making news this week. Lead singer Evan Dando is suing General Motors over what he claims is the unauthorized use of his song "It's a Shame About Ray," in two commercials. Jim and Greg don't hear an alarming similarity, but regardless, they wonder if this is really the best time to be suing GM? Check out the ad for yourself.

Blues singer Koko Taylor died last week at the age of 80. Taylor was a longtime Chicago music icon, but as Greg explains, her influence was far-reaching. She was from the last generation of blues performers to have deep connections to the South. Initially Taylor didn‘t have a lot of confidence in her singing ability, but she developed one of the most bold voices and personas Jim and Greg have ever experienced. Through her partnership with Chicago’s Alligator Records, Koko Taylor defined the Chicago blues sound and paved the way for female blues musicians. In tribute to her our hosts play "I'd Rather Go Blind."

Go to episode 185