Results for The Kinks

interviews

Ray Davies

One man who is certainly not a flash in the pan is Ray Davies. (Pronounced Daviz, not Daveez. We promise.) The former, and perhaps future, Kinks lead singer joins Jim and Greg to talk about his long history making music and his second solo album, Working Man's Café. Ray describes how different it is to make music as a solo artist. When he was writing songs for The Kinks he was able to assume different personas. But, the songs on this new album are much more personal. He has to take the credit… or the blame. Ray performs songs off Working Man's Café, which you can hear during the show.

Some of Ray Davies' songs have undoubtedly been affected by his experience being shot by a mugger in 2004, as well as the stroke of his brother Dave Davies. These subjects perhaps contradict the idea of the songwriter as a wit and social satirist. But, as Ray explains, even the lightest, most humorous Kinks tracks started from a serious place.

Go to episode 125
reviews
Living With the LivingLiving With the Living available on iTunes

Ted Leo and the Pharmacists Living With the Living

Next up is a review of Living With the Living by Ted Leo and the Pharmacists. This is the band's fifth album, but first to be released by Touch and Go Records. Greg thinks Leo is full of energy and enthusiasm, but explains that the singer/songwriter wears his musical influences on his sleeve. It's not difficult to hear the reference points of The Clash, The Kinks and The Jam. Jim agrees, and explains that where the music falls short is when it goes the reggae route. He doesn't think Leo and the band are very good at that style, but adds that The Clash weren't that great at it either. Neither Jim nor Greg can recommend Living With the Living as a whole, but both critics say that Leo and the band give a great live show. The album gets two Burn Its.

JimGreg
Go to episode 68
Other People's LivesOther People's Lives available on iTunes

Ray Davies Other People's Lives

The first album up for review this week is Other People's Lives by former Kinks frontman Ray Davies. This is Davies‘ first solo album, and he seems to be returning to some of his original themes. Many of Davies’ previous songs, including Jim's recent DIJ pick, captured how it feels to be an outsider. Now, as a British rocker living in New Orleans, Davies is writing about those feelings again. The critics are split on their opinions of the album. Jim believes Davies' songwriting is as strong as ever and gives Other People's Lives a Buy It rating. Greg agrees, but doesn't think the sound of the record lives up to the lyrics. For him, it was Pro Tools run amuck and only a Burn It release.

JimGreg
Go to episode 12
Bob Mould Sunshine Rock

Bob Mould Patch The Sky

On his 13th solo album, Sunshine Rock, Hüsker Dü frontman and serious rocker Bob Mould threw longtime fans for a bit of a loop with four song titles referencing the sun and cover art resembling a lollipop. Greg calls it Mould's attempt at bubblegum pop, while Jim compares it to The Kinks' "Waterloo Sunset." He says since Mould formed a power trio with Superchunk drummer Jon Wurster and bassist Jason Narducy (formerly of Verbow) in 2012, he's been at a career high. The most recent albums recorded by that trio (Beauty & Ruin and Patch The Sky) have focused on the deaths of Mould's parents and now Jim says he's emerged in a happier place. It reminds him of Hüsker Dü covering Donovan's "Sunshine Superman." Greg points out the melodies are at the forefront and there's a lyrical theme of reconciliation. "The Final Years" is a wistful look back at time with his parents, while "I Fought" is like a message to his late songwriting partner Grant Hart, moving past bitterness to appreciation. Greg and Jim both appreciate Mould's honesty about who he is now.

JimGreg
Go to episode 690
dijs

Jim

“David Watts”The Kinks

This week Jim gets to choose a Desert Island Jukebox track. He brings the show full circle by choosing a song by another witty British pop group: €”The Kinks. "€œDavid Watts"€ is a song where Ray Davies sneers at Watts, a member of the English upper-crust. Davies takes the gentleman to task for being too gentle. One shouldn'€™t be too quick to label the songwriter a homophobe, however. His 1970 hit song "€œLola"€ was a loving portrait of a transvestite. Whatever the lyrics are about, "€œDavid Watts"€ is a great sing-along, and we encourage all Sound Opinions listeners to do just that.

Go to episode 10
lists

Tax Day Special

No matter what bracket you are in, no one likes paying taxes. Nothing makes things more tolerable, though, than great music. So Jim and Greg have compiled the perfect playlist for Tax Day:

Go to episode 541

Rock Operas

For many music fans, when you hear "Rock Opera," you probably think of The Who's 1969 album Tommy. But, Jim and Greg assert that Tommy is neither the first, nor the best, Rock Opera. Credit for the first goes to S.F. Sorrow by The Pretty Things in 1968. Credit for the best? Well, there's a long list throughout music history, including those listed below. But whatever your favorite, just don't call it a concept album!

  • The Who's Quadrophenia
  • Genesis' The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway
  • Green Day's American Idiot
  • Willie Nelson's Red Headed Stranger
  • Janelle Monae's The Archandroid
  • The Pretty Things's S.F. Sorrow
  • The Kinks' Arthur
  • Lou Reed's Berlin
  • David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust
  • Frank Zappa's Joe's Garage
  • Pink Floyd's The Wall
  • The Decemberists' Crane Wife
  • Neil Young and Crazy Horse's Greendale
  • Andrew Lloyd Webber's Jesus Christ Superstar

Share your favorite at 888.859.1800, at interact@soundopinions.org or on Facebook and Twitter.

Go to episode 455

Tax Day Special

No matter what bracket you are in, no one likes paying taxes. Nothing makes things more tolerable, though, than great music. So Jim and Greg have compiled the perfect playlist for Tax Day:

Go to episode 280

Favorite Literary Rock songs

Recently Jim and Greg were invited to speak at Washington College in Maryland about the relationship between rock and literature. They were eager to share some of their discussion this week on the show…and play music! While pop music doesn‘t get taken as seriously as the great novels of our time, for critics like Jim and Greg and for music fans, it’s as important a“text”as any other. Literary rock can mean multiple things — great rock criticism, poetic lyrics and even songs inspired by literature and poetic lyrics. Here are some of Jim and Greg's favorite Literary Rock songs:

  • Roxy Music, "In Every Dream Home a Heartbreak"
  • The Rolling Stones, "Sympathy for the Devil"
  • Patti Smith, "Gloria"
  • Cannibal Ox, "Iron Galaxy"
  • The Kinks, "The Village Green Preservation Society"**
  • Sly and the Family Stone, "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)"
  • Blur, "Parklife"

**Ray Davies fans should check out his 2008 visit to the show.

Go to episode 176
features

The Shangri-Las - "Leader of the Pack"

leader 2019 marks the 55th anniversary of the song "Leader of the Pack" by The Shangri-Las. For one week in 1964, The Shangri-Las sat atop the Billboard Hot 100, in front of legendary groups like The Supremes, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and The Beach Boys. While it only stayed on the Hot 100 for 12 weeks, the track's impact has extended far beyond 1964. Sound Opinions producer Alex Claiborne talks with writer Ada Wolin about her book Golden Hits of the Shangri-Las and about the group's lasting impact on music and pop culture, as well as their influence over notable punk acts like Blondie and The New York Dolls.

Go to episode 703